Discover South Tyrol - Useful information

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Mountain and ski guide

  • Guiding people on mountain tours over rock and ice or in any case in the mountains
  • Guiding people on ski tours or ski excursions
  • Specialised instruction in mountaineering and ski touring

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Hiking guides

  • Plan and lead hikes on paths and trails
  • Provide interesting facts about the landscape, history, flora and fauna
  • Take the planning and organisational work off your hands

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Alpine School

  • The union of 12 alpine schools
  • Expertise in mountain, flora and fauna
  • Training for increased safety, enjoyment, and know-how in climbing, mountaineering, hiking, ice climbing, skiing, and snowshoeing...

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South Tyrol

A paradise with rough edges. And tips.

If there is such a thing as a mountain paradise, South Tyrol is undoubtedly one of them. The Three Peaks and the Ortler, the Königsspitze and the Similaun, Lodner and Hochgall, Langkofel and Plattkofel, Weißhorn and Schwarzhorn, the Heiligkreuzkofel and the Sextner Sonnenuhr, Schwarzenstein and the Tribulaun: even if the view of South Tyrol's mountains is a very unsystematic one, the heart of all alpinists, climbers and mountain enthusiasts beats faster.  

The Dolomites to the east, the Ortler massif to the west, the Sarntal Alps and the Texel Group in between and the rock and ice mountains of the main Alpine ridge: perhaps the most beautiful thing about South Tyrol's mountains is their diversity, which not only constantly offers something new visually, but also has something for everyone. You are spoilt for choice between challenging, sometimes legendary climbing routes, alpine classics, glacier tours and spectacular via ferratas in the warmer months, sunny (and quite challenging) ski tours, freeride descents and icefall climbs in the colder months.

Speaking of warm and cold seasons: thanks to the Mediterranean influence in South Tyrol, the "warm season" is actually three. And the cold season on the sunny side of the Alps is usually one with a bright blue sky.